DRINKOPAEDIA

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This online search tool is designed to allow you to learn more about non-alcoholic beverages and their ingredients. It is constantly evolving and being updated in order to carry the very latest information.

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Carbonated drink

A carbonated drink is a drink that bubbles and fizzes with carbon dioxide gas. The process by which the gas dissolves in the drink is known as carbonation. This process can occur naturally, such as in naturally carbonated mineral water that absorbs carbon dioxide from the ground, or by man-made processes, as is the case in most soft drinks and soda waters. This involves pumping carbon dioxide into the drink at high pressure, then sealing the container. Since the solubility of carbon dioxide is less at lower pressure, the dissolved gas escapes as bubbles when the container is opened and the pressure is relieved. 

The maximum amount of carbon dioxide that can be dissolved in water is 8 g per litre. The excess will normally only remain in water when the drink is under pressure. Once the pressure is released - i.e. when the container is exposed to normal atmospheric pressure - the carbon dioxide will begin to escape. So once a bottle or can of a carbonated drink is opened, the beverage will start to go flat. In a similar way, your stomach don't have enough pressure to hold excess carbon dioxide in side you either, which is why such drinks can result in burping.

The process of artificial carbonation was invented by Joseph Preistley in England in 1767,and the first commercialisation was by Jacob Schweppes - a carbonated beverage of mineral water - in Switzerland in 1783. 

Carbonated drinks are very popular throughout the world. In many drinks, the carbonation is used to give "bite" to the flavour. Interestingly, the fizzy sensation of the drinks is almost never caused by the bubbles, but in fact by the presence of dilute carbonic acid created during carbonation. This acid creates a mild tingling sensation on the tongue. 

There are no known health effects of carbonated drinks.